Pollution Documents

  • 1972
  • California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations
  • Some  Aspects  of Pollution in San Diego County Lagoons
      • http://www.calcofi.org/newhome/publications/CalCOFI_Reports/v16/pdfs/Vol_16_Bradshaw___Mudie.pdf
  • “The effluent adds a large nutrient load to the naturally nutrient-rich lagoon water, and results in a stimulation of excessive plant growth. Phytoplankton in some lagoons may be so prolific that the water turns pea green ; other lagoons become covered with rafts of filamentous algae (Enteromorpha spp.). Following an algal bloom, the decomposition of plant material may result in the lowering of dissolved oxygen to such low concentrations that fish and other aquatic organisms can no longer survive; the death of these organisms further adds to the organic load and the oxygen deficiency. Other undesirable effects of this eutrophication process include the accumulation of sludge from the partially decomposed organic matter, the development of foul odors, and a lowering of the esthetic and recreational values of the lagoons.”
  • “The most important factor affecting the lagoon ecosystems appears to be the size of the tidal prism, which is the volume of water exchanged by the tide. If the tidal prism is reduced below a critical volume (due to obstruction of the entrance channel, or to decrease of river inflow or lagoon volume) , long-shore transported sand fills in the lagoon mouth, and tidal exchange ceases until the entrance barrier is breached by river flooding or by artificial means. If the lagoon remains closed for an extended period of time, the ecosystem changes from one characteristic of protected inshore ocean water to one dominated by brackish water (when the volume of fresh water inflow is high) or by hypersaline water (when the fresh water inflow is small).”
  • “Lagoons with tidal prisms in the “critical range” tend to remain open only a few months of the year but can be kept open artificially by annual small-scale dredging of the entrance channel. The salinity of the water in these variable lagoons is subject to great seasonal variation, the maximum range being approximately 10 to 65%.”
  • “Los Penasquitos, San Elijo, Batiquitos and Del Mar lagoons are variable lagoons. Prior to the inflow of significant volumes of sewage effluent (commencing between 1955 and 1960), these lagoons probably supported a limited euryhaline biota, with brackish water elements appearing temporarily during periods of fresh water accumulation. The biology of these variable lagoons has undoubtedly been altered by their history of secondary d u e n t discharge.”
  • “The effluent entering Batiquitos Lagoon now comprises a relatively small volume of irrigation runoff and overflow from a sewage effluent storage dam. However, extensive sludge beds still exist in the lagoon from an earlier period of greater sewage discharge. Most of these polluted lagoons presently support an impoverished aquatic fauna comprising a few species of fish and large populations of Tubificidae, chironomids and ostracods. The phytoplankton is usually dominated by unicellular or colonial green algae, several species of which commonly number well over 100,000 cells/ml during bloom periods.”
  • In 1972 the Batiquitos Lagoon was “Variable” (partially or sometimes open to tidal flows)
  • 2002
  • January 25, 2002 – State Water Resources Control Board
  • San Diego Region Nonpoint Source-Related Groups and Organizations
  • http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/sandiego/water_issues/programs/wmc/docs/wmchtnps9group102.pdf
  • This document contains a list of all groups and organizations in the San Diego Region and what type general water issues they are involved in. This is a very comprehensive list of groups and organizations.
  • 2004
  • September 8, 2004 – California Regional Water Quality Control Board San Diego Region
  • Waste Discharge Requirements For Leucadia Wastewater District Forest R. Gafner Water Reclamation Plant San Diego County
  • http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/sandiego/board_decisions/adopted_orders/2004/2004_0223.pdf
  • 2006
  • June 2, 2006 – California Coastal Commission
  • Batiquitos Lagoon
  • http://www.coastal.ca.gov/nps/Web/cca_pdf/socoastpdf/CCA75BatiquitosLagoon.pdf
  • 2007
  • April 19, 2007 – California Coastal Commission
  • Presentation by Port of Los Angeles on the Batiquitos Lagoon restoration project in San Diego County and California least tern nesting and foraging in the Port of Los Angeles.
  • http://documents.coastal.ca.gov/reports/2007/5/Th8a-5-2007.pdf
  • November 9, 2007 – California Coastal Commission
  • Addendum to Item 20b, Coastal Commission Permit Application  #A-6-ENC-07-51 (Surfer’s Point), for the Commission Meeting of November 16, 2007
  • http://documents.coastal.ca.gov/reports/2007/11/F20b-11-2007.pdf
  • Proposal to make storm drain improvement.
  • 2008
  • July 29, 2008 – Clean Water Act
  • Federal Water Pollution Control Act
  • http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/laws_regulations/docs/fedwaterpollutioncontrolact.pdf
  • 2010
  • February 3, 2010 – Water Quality Management in Lake San Marcos
  • Water Quality Management in Lake San Marcos: Analysis of Available Data
  • http://www.swrcb.ca.gov/rwqcb9/board_info/agendas/2010/feb/item8/Supporting_Document_3.pdf
  • 1972California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries InvestigationsSome  Aspects  of Pollution in San Diego County Lagoonshttp://www.calcofi.org/newhome/publications/CalCOFI_Reports/v16/pdfs/Vol_16_Bradshaw___Mudie.pdf“The effluent adds a large nutrient load to the naturally nutrient-rich lagoon water, and results in a stimulation of excessive plant growth. Phytoplankton in some lagoons may be so prolific that the water turns pea green ; other lagoons become covered with rafts of filamentous algae (Enteromorpha spp.). Following an algal bloom, the decomposition of plant material may result in the lowering of dissolved oxygen to such low concentrations that fish and other aquatic organisms can no longer survive; the death of these organisms further adds to the organic load and the oxygen deficiency. Other undesirable effects of this eutrophication process include the accumulation of sludge from the partially decomposed organic matter, the development of foul odors, and a lowering of the esthetic and recreational values of the lagoons.”“The most important factor affecting the lagoon ecosystems appears to be the size of the tidal prism, which is the volume of water exchanged by the tide. If the tidal prism is reduced below a critical volume (due to obstruction of the entrance channel, or to decrease of river inflow or lagoon volume) , long-shore transported sand fills in the lagoon mouth, and tidal exchange ceases until the entrance barrier is breached by river flooding or by artificial means. If the lagoon remains closed for an extended period of time, the ecosystem changes from one characteristic of protected inshore ocean water to one dominated by brackish water (when the volume of fresh water inflow is high) or by hypersaline water (when the fresh water inflow is small).”“Lagoons with tidal prisms in the “critical range” tend to remain open only a few months of the year but can be kept open artificially by annual small-scale dredging of the entrance channel. The salinity of the water in these variable lagoons is subject to great seasonal variation, the maximum range being approximately 10 to 65%.”“Los Penasquitos, San Elijo, Batiquitos and Del Mar lagoons are variable lagoons. Prior to the inflow of significant volumes of sewage effluent (commencing between 1955 and 1960), these lagoons probably supported a limited euryhaline biota, with brackish water elements appearing temporarily during periods of fresh water accumulation. The biology of these variable lagoons has undoubtedly been altered by their history of secondary d u e n t discharge.”“The effluent entering Batiquitos Lagoon now comprises a relatively small volume of irrigation runoff and overflow from a sewage effluent storage dam. However, extensive sludge beds still exist in the lagoon from an earlier period of greater sewage discharge. Most of these polluted lagoons presently support an impoverished aquatic fauna comprising a few species of fish and large populations of Tubificidae, chironomids and ostracods. The phytoplankton is usually dominated by unicellular or colonial green algae, several species of which commonly number well over 100,000 cells/ml during bloom periods.”In 1972 the Batiquitos Lagoon was “Variable” (partially or sometimes open to tidal flows)2002January 25, 2002 – State Water Resources Control BoardSan Diego Region Nonpoint Source-Related Groups and Organizationshttp://www.waterboards.ca.gov/sandiego/water_issues/programs/wmc/docs/wmchtnps9group102.pdfThis document contains a list of all groups and organizations in the San Diego Region and what type general water issues they are involved in. This is a very comprehensive list of groups and organizations.2004September 8, 2004 – California Regional Water Quality Control Board San Diego RegionWaste Discharge Requirements For Leucadia Wastewater District Forest R. Gafner Water Reclamation Plant San Diego Countyhttp://www.waterboards.ca.gov/sandiego/board_decisions/adopted_orders/2004/2004_0223.pdf2006June 2, 2006 – California Coastal CommissionBatiquitos Lagoonhttp://www.coastal.ca.gov/nps/Web/cca_pdf/socoastpdf/CCA75BatiquitosLagoon.pdf2007April 19, 2007 – California Coastal CommissionPresentation by Port of Los Angeles on the Batiquitos Lagoon restoration project in San Diego County and California least tern nesting and foraging in the Port of Los Angeles.http://documents.coastal.ca.gov/reports/2007/5/Th8a-5-2007.pdfNovember 9, 2007 – California Coastal CommissionAddendum to Item 20b, Coastal Commission Permit Application  #A-6-ENC-07-51 (Surfer’s Point), for the Commission Meeting of November 16, 2007http://documents.coastal.ca.gov/reports/2007/11/F20b-11-2007.pdfProposal to make storm drain improvement.2008July 29, 2008 – Clean Water ActFederal Water Pollution Control Acthttp://www.waterboards.ca.gov/laws_regulations/docs/fedwaterpollutioncontrolact.pdf2010February 3, 2010 – Water Quality Management in Lake San MarcosWater Quality Management in Lake San Marcos: Analysis of Available Datahttp://www.swrcb.ca.gov/rwqcb9/board_info/agendas/2010/feb/item8/Supporting_Document_3.pdf

If you see important documents that are missing, please let me know by listing them in the comment area below. Thank you.

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